Making Connections

Title

Making Connections

Description

This collection links what would be considered "art" with the novels we read in this class. Some of the "art" includes paintings, film, and poetry.

Contributor

Andréa Rivard

Items in the Making Connections Collection

Henry Reed is a poet with whom the Birmingham Surrealists associated. He's best known for the series he wrote Lessons of War, but most specifically for Part 1: "Naming of Parts." "Naming of Parts" is an excellent link between surrealism as an art…

This is a film written by Salvador Dali, a Catalan surrealist. I'm not going to attempt to explain what is going on in the film, as surrealism is left open to interpretation intentionally. To continue the theme here, though, this film relates to many…

Giaconda, 1953
Maybe you can guess, but the instant I saw this image, I thought of George Orwell's Coming Up for Air. While Orwell's novel actually came first, this painting shows the mundane life that George, the protagonist, was speaking of. The men in bowler…

Of the novels we read from the 20th Century in Europe, the most surrealist of them was Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys. This painting of Magritte's reminded me of the book because of how fragmented an identity can become. First, Annette is a piece of…

This painting by Magritte, who is one of the most well-known and influential surrealists, deals with body image and identity. As we are connecting novels to higher art forms, this particular piece made me think of Orlando by Virginia Woolf. One…

This poem by André Breton disects the female body and compares the parts to very non-bodylike things. This made me think of Breton's speaker as someone who objectifies the woman he is with, much like Rochester does to Annette in Wide Sargasso Sea.…

Like most other items in this collection, Dali's painting deals with the idea of identity and body. Dali leaves out bodies completely from this composition, which forces us to look at what makes identity that surrounds us. This can be directly…

I have chosen to include the words of Duchamp here because I believe that they reveal a truth about both surrealism and the works that are classified as such. There isn't a book we read in this class that didn't have something to do with the mind,…